admissionsessay

Elite essays

On the other hand, we believe that there is now ample evidence to show that all experience is retained in some portion of the psychic whole, and that although it may not have been consciously realized at all, it will still have been subconsciously registered. The infliction of stripes and of hideous mutilations is frequently directed in the Capitularies, and even torture and banishment for life are prescribed as a punishment for insulting bishops and priests in church.[1503] This apparent inconsistency is only a repetition of what we have seen in the Persian and Indian institutions, where torture was superfluous in the presence of other forms of proof, and in Greece and Rome where it makes its appearance in the absence of those forms. If you look at _Catiline_—that dreary Pyrrhic victory of tragedy—you find two passages to be successful: Act II. The progress of an artist is a continual self-sacrifice, a continual extinction of personality. You may talk to them on matters of business, and what they have to do for you (as lords talk to bruisers on subjects of _fancy_, or country-squires to their grooms on horse-racing) but out of that narrow sphere, to any general topic, you cannot lead them; the conversation soon flags, and you go back to the old question, or are obliged to break up the sitting for want of ideas in common. would be exerted along the line of morality, of more careful book selection, of judicial mindedness instead of one-sidedness. Material bearing on these local matters rarely consists of books. I appear before you this evening to enter a plea for one of the most neglected branches of learning, for a study usually considered hopelessly dry and unproductive—that of American aboriginal languages. They are pleasing excrescences—hindrances, not helps in an argument. It is added that, taking advantage of a quibble as to the kind of instrument employed, he lapsed again into the sin of shaving, when the anger of Heaven manifested itself by allowing him to fall into the hands of an enemy, who put out his eyes.[1276] Yet, on the other hand, the ordeal sometimes was regarded as the most satisfactory kind of proof, entitled to respect beyond any other species of evidence. The host, desiring to poke a little quiet fun, asked him whether it were lawful to baptize a man in soup. What he gets at the library fills him with amazement and gratitude. He weighs accurately the good and evil in Fletcher: he perceives the essential theatricality, but his comparison of the _Faithful Shepherdess_ with _Comus_ is a judgment no word of which can be improved upon: The difference between this poem [_i.e._ the _Faithful Shepherdess_] and Milton’s exquisitely imitative _Comus_ is the difference between a rose with a leaf or two faded or falling, but still fragrant and radiant, and the faultless but scentless reproduction of a rose in academic wax for the admiration and imitation of such craftsmen as must confine their ambition to the laurels of a college or the plaudits of a school. Unfortunately there is flux and change all about us. The child’s game of making faces is an excellent example. Perhaps there is too much the appearance of relaxation and trifling (as if he had escaped the shackles of rhyme), a caprice, a levity, and a disposition to innovate in words and ideas. They therefore like what glitters to the eye, what is smooth to the touch; but they shun, by an instinct of sovereign taste, whatever has a soul in it, or implies a reciprocity of feeling. They walk about loaded with a multitude of baubles, in weight and sometimes in value not inferior to an ordinary Jew’s-box, some of which may sometimes be of some little use, but all of which might at all times be very well spared, and of which the whole utility is not worth the fatigue of bearing the burden. It is true, too, that an ellipse is, of all curve lines after a circle, the simplest and most easily conceived; and it is true, besides all this, that, while Kepler took from the motion of the Planets the easiest of all proportions, that of equality, he did not leave them absolutely without one, but ascertained the rule by which their velocities continually varied; for a genius so fond of analogies, when he had taken away one, would be sure to substitute another in its room. Among persons that we should all agree are mal-employed are all those writing books or plays that are morally harmful, as well as those concerned in publishing such books or producing such plays, and, for the moment, all who are reading or witnessing them; persons engaged in manufacturing or distributing useless or harmful products; all who do work of any kind so badly that inconvenience or harm results; unnecessary middlemen whose intervention in the process of distribution only impedes it and adds to its expense. He hunts vermin for food: he is himself hunted like vermin for prey. These intellectual Sysiphuses are always rolling elite essays the stone of knowledge up a hill, for the perverse pleasure of rolling it down again. The fiery Catalan fell into the snare, and in order to clear himself of the charge, which was not ill-founded, he offered to meet his accuser in combat and determine their rights to the Sicilian throne. This brief reference to some of the more noticeable influences which affect the inherent character of the subjective mind may help to indicate the importance of the Law of Suggestion with regard to the theory of conscience (literally self-knowledge–but in practice more often lack of self-knowledge). It would be well for some of us if we should forget for the moment the difference between fiction and non-fiction and should try to mend this broken link. In poetry, one pleasing or striking image obviously suggests another: the increasing the sense of beauty or grandeur is the principle of composition: in prose, the professed object is to impart conviction, and nothing can be admitted by way of ornament or relief, that does not add new force or clearness to the original conception. When a tranquil observer of his social world laughs at the pretences, at the futilities, or it may be at the vagaries of its high dignitaries, he may not improbably feel half-terrified at the sound of his laugh; so firmly has our early schooling set in us a tendency to regard as insolent upstarts all small things when they challenge big ones: whether a “cheeky” schoolboy standing up to his big senior, or a small country confronting a big one, or a “petty” anti-war minority facing a “practically unanimous” people. alluded as that by which suspected heretics should clear themselves.[249] Zealous inquisitors, however, paid little attention to such forms which allowed their victims a chance of escape, for it is related of Conrad of Marburg, who for a short time spread terror and desolation throughout Germany, that when the accused confessed he subjected them to torture and the frightful penance provided by the church, but that when they denied their guilt he sent them at once to the stake. This was that Parmenio of whom Philip used to say, that the Athenians were very fortunate who could find ten generals every year, while he himself, in the whole course of his life, could never find one but Parmenio. The golden rule here is direct personal contact; and don’t forget the last syllable–tact. A purely materialistic monism cannot contain it. Thus the first necessity of the library may be books on music, and a secondary need may be books on water supply. He is just the reverse of another person whom I know—for, as G—— never allows a particle of merit to any one till it is acknowledged by the whole world, C—— withholds his tribute of applause from every person, in whom any mortal but himself can descry the least glimpse of understanding. Sir Isaac Newton first attempted to give a physical account of the motions of the Planets, which should accommodate itself to all the constant irregularities which astronomers had ever observed in their motions. He also observes, “As water, when pent up so that it cannot escape, acquires a higher level, so, in a place where it can escape, the same operation produces a current, and this current will extend to a greater or less distance according to the force by which it is produced.” Currents flowing alternately in opposite directions are also occasioned by the rise and fall of the tides. What pity, we think, that any thing should spoil and corrupt so agreeable a situation. How the ladies of quality and fashion must bless themselves from being made to look like Dr. Although this word is apparently a synthesis of _ce_, one, _maitl_, arm, and means “one arm,” it is uniformly rendered by the early writers _una braza_, a fathom. The belle of the ball may be surrounded with admirers, but if clad in rags and seated in a gutter she might excite no favorable notice. When, therefore, we find a weapon of a material not obtainable in the vicinity, we have a sure indication that it belongs to a period of development considerably later than the earliest. Northward, in the sea of Canada, in Waigat’s straits, in the straits of Java, and in short, where the ocean on one part pours into the ocean on the other. THE LIBRARY AS A MUSEUM Boundary regions are always interesting. The fear of giving offence destroys sincerity, and without sincerity there can be no true enjoyment of society, nor unfettered exertion of intellectual activity.—Those who have been accustomed to live with the great are hardly considered as conversible persons in literary society. This has been adduced by Dr. But where there was satisfactory proof, compurgation was not allowed, and in homicide cases, if a relative of the slain decided to proceed by the duel, his claim of vengeance was supreme, and no other process was admissible.[223] It is evident, however, that compurgation retained its hold on popular respect when we see, about 1300, the Emperor Albert I. Thus, though upon hearing of a misfortune that had befallen my friend, I should conceive precisely that degree of concern which he gives way to; yet till I am informed of the manner in which he behaves, till I perceive the harmony between his emotions and mine, I cannot be said to approve of the sentiments which influence his behaviour. In the extraordinary torture, the weight was increased to two hundred and fifty pounds, and when the victim was raised to a sufficient height he was dropped and arrested with a jerk that dislocated his joints, the operation being thrice repeated.[1630] Thus, in 1549, we see the system in full operation in the case of Jacques de Coucy, who, in 1544, had surrendered Boulogne to the English. He only grows more enamoured of his task, proportionally patient, indefatigable, and devotes more of the day to study. Away then with this idle cant, as if every thing were barbarous and without interest, that is not the growth of our own times and of our own taste; with this everlasting evaporation of mere sentiment, this affected glitter of style, this equivocal generation of thought out of ignorance and vanity, this total forgetfulness of the subject, and display of the writer, as if every possible train of speculation must originate in the pronoun _I_, and the world had nothing to do but to look on and admire. This, however, is the country in which all marriages, without exception, are made up by the parents, and in which a young man would think himself disgraced for ever, if he showed the least preference of one woman above another, or did not express the most complete indifference, both about the time when, and the person to whom, he was to be married. The principal resource for the repression of crime was by giving free scope to the vengeance of the injured party, and by providing fixed rates of composition by which he could be bought off. We have only to imagine, that his erroneous tales were, in the first instance, listened to (a fact, this, of injudicious treatment, which is too common,) with seeming assent and delight, until he found, from daily experience, that to please others, he had only to encourage his foolish thoughts, and utter them, and then the habit would insensibly grow upon him, until it became inveterate; and hence is explained another singularity about him,—that in his present manner of talking, it appears as if he were talking absurdly for the very purpose of amusing others. Though the doctrine of Demons, or being possessed, has been discarded; yet, in my opinion, it deserves a more serious consideration than medical men imagine:—it involves the true theory of mind and matter, their connection with each other, and the principles on which this connection depends, and by which it is regulated. It could not have been in any respect by the mouth, therefore, but altogether by the navel-string, that such children had been nourished and fed up to the degree of health and vigour in which they were born. If, on the contrary, the bad player notwithstanding all his blunders, should, in the elite essays same manner, happen to win, his success can give him but little satisfaction. In 1325, according to the story, a French Jew feigned conversion to Christianity in order to gratify his spleen by mutilating the images in the churches, and at length he committed the sacrilege of carrying off the holy wafer to aid in the hideous rites of his fellows. When a person dies by disease, they suppose he has been killed by some sorcery, or some unknown venomous creature. Practice makes perfect—experience makes us wise.

essays elite. There is a heartiness and determined resolution; a willingness to contend with opposition; a superiority to ease and pleasure; some sullen pride, but no trifling vanity. I have here emphasised the higher moral reasons which will urge the good man to restrain his laughter. What has led to a complete change of views as to the prehistoric population of Southern Europe? ‘Ajoutez a cela une reflexion qui vous frappera, je m’assure, quand vous y aurez pense; c’est que si nous etions purement passifs dans l’usage de nos sens, il n’y auroit entr’eux aucun communication; il nous seroit impossible de connoitre que le corps que nous touchons, et l’objet que nous voyons sont le meme. It is not, of course, the dimness or distance _per se_ which magnifies the object of appreciation; unaided that would merely have the opposite effect. “This man, arraigned in a cause, is weighed upon thee. In the nineteenth century another mentality manifested itself It is evident in a very able and brilliant poem, Goethe’s _Faust_. The accompanying text, corresponding to the “labels” of museum collections, may be on the same sheet as the plates (often on the reverse side) or on separate sheets, which may be bound into a book even when the plates are separate. Robinson reminds us that a tickled child will roll over on his back just like a puppy. A man who gravely informs you, as an important philosophical discovery, that ‘the tendrils of vines curl round poles,’ and that ‘the human body is endowed with material properties,’ may escape without the imputation of intending to delude the unwary. The effects are too often but too little regarded. What an exchange of civilities and of titles! He should have the complete command, not only over his countenance, but over his limbs and motions. CHAPTER XI. Here are some of the things that our department-heads like best: “earnestness, industry and intelligence” “alertness; readiness to take suggestion” “excellent standards of work” “close application to business” “absolute dependability” “persistence” “excellent worker; steady; reliable” “enthusiasm and eagerness to learn” “close attention to business” “tenacity and faith in herself” “minds her own business” “fine spirit in work” “obliging, willing and ready service” “industry and intelligence” “general information” “calm, cheerful nature” “honesty of purpose” “patience under criticism” “politeness and willingness to oblige” “loyalty, faithfulness and goodness” “accuracy and systematic methods” “neat and ambitious” All these things are fine, I agree, but there is not one of them that suggests the possibility of advancement to a position of command where administrative ability and initiative will count. They were essentially different in their form of government, their habits and their daily pursuits. Titian in his portraits appears to have understood the principle of historical design better than any body. This is an interesting feature, to which I shall refer later. Our passions are to them an impertinence; an expression of high sentiment they rather shrink from as a ludicrous and upstart assumption of equality. Now it is not to be supposed that these organs are thus separated merely for separation’s sake, but that there is something in the quality or texture of the substance of the brain in each organ, peculiarly fitted for each different sort of impression, and by an excess of quantity producing an excess of faculty. This would be still more the case, if the same person both danced and sung; a practice very common among the ancients: it requires good lungs and a vigorous constitution; but with these advantages and long practice, the very highest dances may be performed in this manner. Thus harmony and beauty were objects of the reflex senses. {122a} When on his death-bed, his gratitude and affection to his attendant (who was certainly an excellent nurse) were very pleasing. But words are a key to the affections. Cooper had to attend a country-meeting soon after at Boulton-le-Moors, and one of the country magistrates coming to the inn for the same purpose, and when he asked ‘If any one was in the room!’ receiving for answer—‘No one but Mr. It was long before he learned to shape and adjust the stone to the end of the stick, and to hurl this by means of a cord attached to a second and elastic stick—in other words, a bow; still longer before he discovered the art of fashioning clay into vessels and of polishing and boring stones. “Children,” he says, “largely in virtue of their suggestibility, rapidly absorb the knowledge, beliefs, and especially the sentiments of their social environment. I am of opinion that no medical treatment in any case can be fixed as certain or judicious unless we understood the origin and nature of disease; and I have therefore devoted a considerable portion of this Essay to the consideration of the correspondence which exists between the causes and effects produced; and this I only consider as preliminary to a more full and adequate investigation of causes than I am aware has hitherto been made; but still, as preliminary to this important subject, I shall, in my next Essay, first give a general explanation of the origin and cause of disease, and this in agreement with a principle which I conceive to be of universal application. This particular man had worked for years in and about a summer camp and had thus associated with people from the city whose appreciation of the fine prospects from cliff and summit was unusually keen. Secretion, for instance, is a common name, and secretion in general has no particular organ; but the particular secretions, as of saliva, bile, tears, &c. Landscape-painting is free from these tormenting dilemmas and embarrassments. Neither can that faculty help us to this any other way, than by representing to us what would be our own, if we were in his case. [11] “Conscience, its Origin and Authority,” p. So with the reading public. II.–_Of the Extent of this Influence of Fortune._ THE effect of this influence of fortune is, first, to diminish our sense of the merit or demerit of those actions which arose from the most laudable or blamable intentions, when they fail of producing their proposed effects: and, secondly, to increase our sense of the merit or demerit of {89} actions, beyond what is due to the motives or affections from which they proceed, when elite essays they accidentally give occasion either to extraordinary pleasure or pain. Louis was endeavoring to break down the feudal customs. There are some poets whose every line has unique value. I gravely doubt that they felt the shafts of the tender passion with any such susceptibility as to employ this metaphor. The struggle for its coveted column seems hardly less violent than that for the fashionable gathering. I look to see this library, in the home city of James Whitcomb Riley, grow into a place in the public heart comparable with that which was attained by Riley himself. Is there not light and serious poetry? His jests shall be echoed with loud laughter, because his own lungs begin to crow like chanticleer, before he has uttered them; while a little hectic nervous humourist shall stammer out an admirable conceit that is damned in the doubtful delivery—_vox faucibus h?sit_.—The first shall tell a story as long as his arm, without interruption, while the latter stops short in his attempts from mere weakness of chest: the one shall be empty and noisy and successful in argument, putting forth elite essays the most common-place things ‘with a confident brow and a throng of words, that come with more than impudent sauciness from him,’ while the latter shrinks from an observation ‘too deep for his hearers,’ into the delicacy and unnoticed retirement of his own mind. A man’s personal identity and self-interest have just the same principle and extent, and can reach no farther than his actual existence. Most of us can recollect a time when our acquaintances were likely to be shocked by the occurrence in a book of the expletive “damn”–that is, if it were spelled out. Every word should be a blow: every thought should instantly grapple with its fellow.